How to make any TV a Smart TV

There was plenty of interesting advancements in home based entertainment within the last couple of years, but one is unique: smart TVs. Internet connected TV screens that pipe through all kinds of video on demand and then some. Everyone from Samsung to Philips will be vying to encourage doubters just why their smart TV is the smartest.
However the big brands aren’t telling you something: the television you have got in the living room is already smart. It’s not that hard to transform your flatscreen to a web TV with gear you have in all probability already, without cost. Keep reading, and we’ll explain to you how.

Got a gaming system?

Got an Xbox 360 console or Sony PS3? Then you’ve got the ideal smart TV money can get already. Both have access to an entire range of services already, including ESPN, Syfy, YouTube, Hulu, Netflix and several other available services. Both consoles can stream media directly from your laptop or computer. Sony’s gaming system can also be controlled with the remote control that is included with most advanced TVs. Both provide lots of content in HD, though Xbox users will have to pay the Gold subscription for everything other than the basics.
It is possible to get some of the services on the Nintendo Wii too, though not in high definition. Movie streaming service Netflix is also included in the Wii Shop Channel. If you would like stream your video from a PC, you can utilize a free application called Orb.

Some Blu-ray players (particularly Sony and Samsung models) will come with with web services built-in, so have a look in their instruction manuals to determine.

Tablet double duty

If you’ve got a tablet handy, you’ve probably got another smart TV option too. Every generation of Apple’s iPad could be connected to a TV using the official Digital AV Adapter, enabling you to play-back whatever you can view on your own iPad on your own Tv, from iTunes Tv program downloads to iPlayer and YouTube videos.

Got an Android tablet? If it’s got an HDMI (hd multimedia interface) slot perhaps you can do exactly exactly the same, and enjoy Flash video on any website too. It is likely you won’t possess the right cable in the box, but you can pick up a micro HDMI cable on Amazon for under $5.

Use your phone

Without a tablet, an advanced smartphone might also solve the issue for you. Apple’s iPhone works using its Digital AV Adapter in precisely the same way so that you can hook them up with ease and play all of your videos and stream from apps.

If you’ve got an Android phone meanwhile you could be in luck too. Some older Android phones use the same micro HDMI connection as Android tablets – and then there are apps which could permit you to take control of your TV right from your phone meaning you can do it all straight from your sofa.

Newer top of the line phones such as Samsung Galaxy line and HTC One all have a regular sized HDMI cable, but you’ll need something called an MHL (Mobile High-Definition Link) adapter to connect it. They are again available through trusted online retailers like Amazon, but once it’s plugged in, work the same.
Connect your laptop
Similar to a tablet, you can always plug in your laptop right to your TV to stream web video like a smart TV. Some laptops use a HDMI connection so a standard HDMI cable will do the trick, while other olders will only have a VGA connector (15-pins in three rows) or maybe a DVI connector (29 pins). If your TV doesn’t have either of them, you can aquire an HDMI adaptor for both that’ll share your laptop’s screen to your TV, however, you may need a different audio cable too.

Add Wi-Fi

Many new TVs are “Wi-Fi Ready”, meaning they could be linked to the internet, but you’ll need to purchase another little USB dongle to connect and hook them up to your network. Take a look in the user manual to see if yours is and be sure to search around: you can find discounted prices online, and many accept third party equivalents.
Time to Shop

If you’ve not got any of these, don’t despair: you could make your TV a smart TV using one of many little digital tuners or Android based mini-pc sticks. Google recently released its Chromecast media streamer, priced at $35. Check out our reviews of them all to find out which would be the right one for you.

Corporate Gymnastics: Balancing Data System Opportunities and Challenges for IT Firms

It is no surprise that with every opportunity comes challenge.  For most firms, opportunities for growth are balanced by challenges, obstacles that can inhibit success.  Information technology (IT) firms often face this dilemma when dealing with data systems.  Data mastery yields competitive advantage for IT firms; therefore, demand for data systems and proper database management continues to increase.  This increased demand for data mastery puts IT firms in a tight position, especially when considering costs to acquire and maintain data systems.

Data systems can provide corporations with the ability to store and track consumer information.  Transaction processing systems (TPS) specifically trace business exchanges so that firms can obtain digital profiles of consumers.  TPS monitors standard business transactions that occur frequently and encodes transaction information in databases.  These systems help firms understand customers and market products that meet customer needs and interests based on the information they provide.  Other forms of data systems include enterprise software such as customer relationship management and supply chain management systems. Particularly, these two systems are used by firms to keep tabs on their interactions with customers, manufacturers, and distributors.  It also looks at customer’s sales and shopping habits. This data helps corporations operate more effectively and efficiently as they are able to understand the needs and wants of their customers and business partners.

As enterprise software systems become more integrated and the value of data systems increases, problems also arise.  Privacy concerns reign among the issues proceeding data system development.  Consumers and firms alike fear data breaching, or the accidental revealing of private information. With a single system glitch or hack, data can be made publicly accessible, even for criminals.  Consumers can be faced with identity theft from improper database management.  Firms could incur loss of sales and customer loyalty, lawsuits, more government legislation on database systems, and negative brand image.  Monetary costs are also an issue for IT firms.  Data systems continue to become increasingly expensive to obtain and maintain as more firms rely on them for support.

Finding a balance between the demand for data systems and the costs of acquiring and maintaining them can be troublesome for many corporations.  Data mastery provides a shear competitive advantage but firms should be weary of both monetary costs and privacy concerns that come with this opportunity for growth.  Being able to walk on a corporate balance beam between the two will enable firms to use these systems to their advantage.

Rikomagic MK802 history

The original MK802 Android mini PC showed us that we could have an entire Android PC on something the size of a flash drive. But this was only the beginning. PCs that run Android are coming. And sooner or later, you’ll probably own one.

The Rikomagic MK802 Android mini PC was the first device of its kind. Until it came out, the only Android devices we’d seen were smartphones and tablets. We knew that Android was destined to be on all sorts of devices eventually. It’s able to run on lower-power, lower-performance hardware. The PC on a stick devices, though, took us all by surprise.

With an Android PC stick you can make your old TV or extra monitor into a full-fleged smart TV, as long as it has an HDMI port. Then what you get is the full Android 4.1 experience. Android 4.1 – Jelly Bean for all the Fan-droids out there- was optimized for larger screens than previous versions of Android. It’s still an OS designed for phones and tablets, so resolution can be a little jagged on large TVs, but Android 4.1 was certainly an improvement.

Rikomagic MK802 Mini PC Specs

The specs are nothing too impressive in general, but for under $100, it’s not too bad at all.

  • Android 4.0 (can also boot Ubuntu)
  • single core 1.5 Ghz Cortex A8 processor
  • ARM Mali-400 GPU
  • 4GB storage
  • 512 MB
  • HDMI port
  • microSD slot

Newer Versions of the MK802

The MK802II didn’t improve a whole lot on the first version, but it added power protection, and a lower price:

  • Android 4.0 (can also boot Ubuntu)
  • single core 1.5 Ghz Cortex A8 processor
  • ARM Mali-400 GPU
  • 4G storage
  • 1 GB of RAM
  • HDMI port
  • microSD slot
  • ESD circuit for power stability
  • lower price

The MK802III doubled the performance of almost every part of the unit:

  • Android 4.1 Jelly Bean (can also boot Ubuntu)
  • dual core 1.6 Ghz Cortex A9 processor
  • AMD Z340 GPU
  • 8GB storage
  • 1 GB of RAM
  • HDMI port
  • microSD slot

The MK802IIIs is the latest version and it brought a few needed improvements:

  • Android 4.1 Jelly Bean (can also boot Ubuntu)
  • dual core 1.6 Ghz Cortex A9 processor
  • ARM Mali-400 GPU
  • 8GB storage
  • 1 GB of RAM
  • 802.11b/g/n
  • HDMI port
  • Bluetooth
  • microSD card slot

Check out this site for more detailed reviews of Android PCs.